Contested terrain: Point Nepean, Victoria

de Jong, Ursula M. 2006, Contested terrain: Point Nepean, Victoria, in Proceedings [of the] Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand XXIII Annual Conference 2006 : SAHANZ 2006 : contested terrains : Fremantle, Western Australia, September 29 - October 2, 2006, Society of Architectural Historians Australia & New Zealand, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 81-88.

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Title Contested terrain: Point Nepean, Victoria
Author(s) de Jong, Ursula M.
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference (23rd : 2006 : Fremantle, W. Aust.)
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 29 September - 2 October 2006
Title of proceedings Proceedings [of the] Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand XXIII Annual Conference 2006 : SAHANZ 2006 : contested terrains : Fremantle, Western Australia, September 29 - October 2, 2006
Editor(s) Mc Minn, Terrance
Stephens, John
Basson, Steve
Publication date 2006
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 81
End page 88
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians Australia & New Zealand
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary It is within the power of place to encompass many meanings, stories, and memories. Point Nepean has always been a contested landscape. But over recent years this 'land' has been the subject of intense debate as its future status is renegotiated. Evidence overwhelmingly suggests that Point Nepean should be recognised again as a unique and inviolable whole, in spite of the Commonwealth Government's division of the land into three parcels. It has always been my contention that all decisions relating to Point Nepean should be made with a clear understanding and appreciation of the natural and cultural significance of the whole area, in the broader context of 'place', such that place governs the approach and decision-making process. It is therefore necessary to not only establish that natural and cultural heritage is inextricably linked, but that it must be approached in an integrated manner.
ISBN 0646465945
9780646465944
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006042

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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