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Online versus postal data collection : a re-examination of the response differences using demographically matched data

McDonald, Heath and Darbyshire, Penny 2006, Online versus postal data collection : a re-examination of the response differences using demographically matched data, in ANZMAC 2006 : Advancing theory, maintaining relevance, proceedings, Queensland University of Technology, School of Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations, Brisbane, Qld..

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Title Online versus postal data collection : a re-examination of the response differences using demographically matched data
Author(s) McDonald, Heath
Darbyshire, Penny
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Marketing. Conference (2006 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane
Conference dates 4-6 December 2006
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2006 : Advancing theory, maintaining relevance, proceedings
Editor(s) Ali, Yunus
van Dessel, Maria
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Academy of Marketing Conference
Total pages 6
Publisher Queensland University of Technology, School of Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Summary Past research has identified differences between online and mail collected responses to the same survey, but differences in the demographics of respondents had also been noted making the cause of the variation unclear. In the research reported here, responses to the same questionnaire, delivered via mail and internet surveys, were demographically matched across a range of variables. This removed the impact of response differences caused by age, gender, type of product consumed and length of customer relationship. Across all the different question types and response scales, significant differences were still found between mail and online respondents, even when data were ipsatised. Notably, online respondents were far less likely to use the end-points of the scale, perhaps indicating issues with the online collection methodology. The conclusion is that the two methods of data collection can not be assumed to be directly inter-changeable, and that the method used can lead to different results if not managed carefully.
ISBN 1741071593
9781741071597
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, The authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006086

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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