The impact of chronic illness on relationships in early adulthood: a comparison study between healthy and arthritic young adults

Cole, Sian and Karantzas, Gery 2006, The impact of chronic illness on relationships in early adulthood: a comparison study between healthy and arthritic young adults, in Relationships: near and far: proceedings of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group 6th Annual Conference, Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title The impact of chronic illness on relationships in early adulthood: a comparison study between healthy and arthritic young adults
Author(s) Cole, Sian
Karantzas, GeryORCID iD for Karantzas, Gery orcid.org/0000-0002-1503-2991
Conference name Australian Psychological Society. Psychology of Relationships Interest Group. Conference (6th: 2006: Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 11-12 November 2006
Title of proceedings Relationships: near and far: proceedings of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group 6th Annual Conference
Editor(s) Wilkinson, Ross
Pearce, Zoe
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Psychological Society Psychology of Relationships Interest Group Conference
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary While engaging in romantic relationships is regarded as a normative task during young adulthood, non-normative life events such as the emergence of chronic illness can mitigate against the successful negotiation of such tasks. Chronic illness brings with it a series of additional challenges and stressors to the realm of personal relationships that are thought to interrupt the development of normative interpersonal and intra-individual processes. However, few studies have examined how young adults faced with a chronic illness such as arthritis navigate romantic relationships and the consequences of illness and relationships on psychological adjustment. The aim of the study was to compare the relationship experiences of healthy young adults with those faced with arthritis. One hundred and nine young adults (M 23.01 years, SD 2.43) took part in the study. Of these participants 41 had been diagnosed with arthritis. A univariate MANOVA revealed arthritic young adults reported significantly more insecure attachment, lower levels of readiness for intimacy, and poorer relationship satisfaction compared to healthy young adults. Further correlational and regression analyses on the arthritic sample revealed psychological adjustment was related to arthritis severity, attachment and components of coping. Findings will be discussed in relation to attachment theory and coping processes.
ISBN 0909881316
9780909881313
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006147

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