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Consumer complaint behaviour in sport consumption

Volkov, Michael, Johnson Morgan, Melissa and Summers, Jane 2004, Consumer complaint behaviour in sport consumption, in Where sport marketing theory meets practice : selected papers from the second annual conference of the Sport Marketing Association, Fitness Information Technology, Morgantown, W. Va., pp. 49-63.

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Title Consumer complaint behaviour in sport consumption
Author(s) Volkov, MichaelORCID iD for Volkov, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-2459-4515
Johnson Morgan, Melissa
Summers, Jane
Conference name Conference of the Sport Marketing Association (2rd : 2004 : Memphis, Tennessee)
Conference location Memphis, Tennessee
Conference dates 18-20 November 2004
Title of proceedings Where sport marketing theory meets practice : selected papers from the second annual conference of the Sport Marketing Association
Editor(s) Pitts, Brenda G.
Publication date 2004
Start page 49
End page 63
Publisher Fitness Information Technology
Place of publication Morgantown, W. Va.
Summary While consumer complaint behaviour, and specifically voicing, has been extensively investigated from the perspective of goods (see Volkov et al., 2003, for a review), there have been fewer studies investigating consumer voicing with regard to services (Andreasen, 1984, 1985; Singh, 1988, 1990; Zeithaml, Berry, & Parasuraman, 1996). Further, no research can be identified in the extant literature with respect to experiential consumer voicing. This research proposes an examination of voicing behaviour of consumers in an experiential consumption setting and uses sport consumption as the context. A review of literature in the area is presented and a proposal for experiential research is offered.

In experiential consumption settings, consumers are more likely to experience emotional reactions to, and be actively involved in, the experience than in traditional consumption episodes (Addis & Holbrook, 2001; Hoffman, Kumar, & Novak, 2003; Lofman, 1991). Further, experiential consumption episodes
involve greater emotional processing, more activity, more evaluation, but less overall cognitive processing than traditional episodes (Lofman, 1991), which in turn is likely to result in different consumer behaviour in these experiential settings.

Tn this study, traditional consumer complaint behaviours are re-examined in an experiential context; specifically, consumption of live sport. It is proposed that these behaviours are not motivated by the traditional antecedents of anger and involvement and, further, that they are not enacted with the purpose of
reducing dissonance. Instead, it would appear that traditional complaint behaviour concepts such as voicing, overt aggression, and assignment of blame take on a more functional role in the sport consumption experience. The possibility exists that for some spectators these complaining behaviours that have traditionally been cJassitIed as negative, actually contribute to overall enjoyment o( and satisfaction with, a sport consumption experience.
ISBN 1885693672
9781885693679
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Fitness Information Technology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006186

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.