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Where else have you been? The effects of diaspora consciousness and transcultural mixtures on ethnic identity

Weerakkody, Niranjala 2006, Where else have you been? The effects of diaspora consciousness and transcultural mixtures on ethnic identity, in Journal of Issues: Proceedings of the Informing Science + Information Technology Conference (InSITE), Informing Science Institute, Santa Rosa, Calif., pp. 709-720.

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Title Where else have you been? The effects of diaspora consciousness and transcultural mixtures on ethnic identity
Author(s) Weerakkody, Niranjala
Conference name Informing Science and IT Education Conference (2006 : Salford, Greater Manchester, England)
Conference location Salford, Greater Manchester, England
Conference dates 25-28 June 2006
Title of proceedings Journal of Issues: Proceedings of the Informing Science + Information Technology Conference (InSITE)
Editor(s) Cohen, Eli B.
Publication date 2006
Conference series Informing Science and Information Technology Education Conference
Start page 709
End page 720
Publisher Informing Science Institute
Place of publication Santa Rosa, Calif.
Keyword(s) demographic categories
ethnic identity
cultural identity
diaspora consciousness
transcultural mixtures
ethnic minorities
validity of research data
cultural identification
confounding variables
qualitative research
Summary In social science research, the demographic categories of ethnicity are linked to what the census bureau considers as a person’s ethnic heritage. However, these categories are based on the societal assumption that members of a given category share the same characteristics and life experiences, even though the heterogeneity between members within a category may be as diverse as between categories. The paper examines the 15 interview subjects of a research study drawn from 10 minority migrant groups, where seven of them indicated significant transcultural experiences before migrating to Australia. It argues that their lived experiences and subjectivity vary from others who migrated directly from their native countries. The formers’ diaspora consciousness and transcultural mixtures may introduce an artifact to a research study’s design, affecting the validity of the data collected. The paper examines other situations where this anomaly can occur and proposes precautions
to minimize its negative effects.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1547-5867
1547-5859
1547-5840
Language eng
Field of Research 200199 Communication and Media Studies not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006193

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.