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How well do ecosystem-based planning units represent different componenets of biodiversity?

Mac Nally, Ralph, Bennett, Andrew, Brown, Geoff W., Lumsden, Linda F., Yen, Alan, Hinkley, Simon, Lillywhite, Peter and Ward, Darren 2002, How well do ecosystem-based planning units represent different componenets of biodiversity?, Ecological applications, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 900-912.

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Title How well do ecosystem-based planning units represent different componenets of biodiversity?
Author(s) Mac Nally, Ralph
Bennett, Andrew
Brown, Geoff W.
Lumsden, Linda F.
Yen, Alan
Hinkley, Simon
Lillywhite, Peter
Ward, Darren
Journal name Ecological applications
Volume number 12
Issue number 3
Start page 900
End page 912
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Place of publication Washington, D.C., Wash.
Publication date 2002-06
ISSN 1051-0761
1939-5582
Summary There are many proposals for managing biodiversity by using surrogates, such as umbrella, indicator, focal, and flagship species. We use the term biodiversity management unit for any ecosystem-based classificatory scheme for managing biodiversity. The sufficiency of biodiversity management unit classification schemes depends upon (1) whether different biotic elements (e.g., trees, birds, reptiles) distinguish between biodiversity management units within a classification (i.e., coherence within classes}; and (2) whether different biotic elements agree upon similarities and dissimilarities among biodiversity management unit classes (i.e., conformance among classes). Recent evaluations suggest that biodiversity surrogates based on few or single taxa are not useful. Ecological vegetation classes are an ecosystem-based classification scheme used as one component for biodiversity management in Victoria, Australia. Here we evaluated the potential for ecological vegetation classes to be used as biodiversity management units in the box-ironbark ecosystem of central Victoria, Australia. Eighty sites distributed among 14 ecological vegetation classes were surveyed in the same ways for tree species, birds, mammals, reptiles, terrestrial invertebrates, and nocturnal flying insects. Habitat structure and geographic separations also were measured, which, with the biotic elements, are collectively referred to as variables. Less than half of the biotic element-ecological vegetation class pairings were coherent. Generalized Mantel tests were used to examine conformance among variables with respect to ecological vegetation classes. While most tests were not significant, birds, mammals, tree species, and habitat structure together showed significant agreement on the rating of similarities among ecological vegetation classes. In this system, use of ecological vegetation classes as biodiversity management units may account reasonably well for birds, mammals, and trees; but reptiles and invertebrates would not be accommodated. We conclude that surrogates will usually have to be augmented or developed as hierarchies to provide general representativeness.
Language eng
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Ecological Society of America
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006439

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.