You are not logged in.

The consistency of false suggestions moderates children`s reports of a single instance of a repeated event: predicting increases and decreases in suggestibility.

Roberts, Kim P. and Powell, Martine 2006, The consistency of false suggestions moderates children`s reports of a single instance of a repeated event: predicting increases and decreases in suggestibility., Journal of experimental child psychology, vol. 94, no. 1, pp. 68-89, doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2005.12.003.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The consistency of false suggestions moderates children`s reports of a single instance of a repeated event: predicting increases and decreases in suggestibility.
Author(s) Roberts, Kim P.
Powell, MartineORCID iD for Powell, Martine orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Journal name Journal of experimental child psychology
Volume number 94
Issue number 1
Start page 68
End page 89
Publisher Academic Press
Place of publication Orlando, Fla.
Publication date 2006-05
ISSN 0022-0965
1096-0457
Keyword(s) eyewitness memory
suggestibility
repeated events
source monitoring
schema
Summary Participants (6- and 7-year-olds, N = 130) participated in classroom activities four times. Children were interviewed about the final occurrence (target event) either 1 week or 4 weeks later, during which half of the event items were described inaccurately. Half of these suggestions were consistent with the theme of the detail across the occurrences (e.g., always sat on a kind of floor mat) or were inconsistent (e.g., sat on a chair). When memory for the target event was tested 1 day later, children falsely recognized fewer inconsistent suggestions than consistent suggestions, especially compared with a control group of children who experienced the event just one time. Furthermore, the longer delay reduced accuracy only for consistent suggestions. Source-monitoring ability was strongly and positively related to resistance to suggestions, and encouraging children to identify the source of false suggestions allowed them to retract a significant proportion of their reports of inconsistent suggestions but not of consistent suggestions. The results suggest that the gist consistency of suggestions determines whether event repetition increases or decreases suggestibility.

Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jecp.2005.12.003
Field of Research 170103 Educational Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Elsevier Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006529

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 27 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 536 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jul 2008, 10:41:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.