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Affect-regulated indirect effects of trait anxiety and trait resilience on self-esteem

Benetti, Celeste and Kambouropoulos, Nicolas 2006, Affect-regulated indirect effects of trait anxiety and trait resilience on self-esteem, Personality and individual differences, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 341-352, doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2006.01.015.

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Title Affect-regulated indirect effects of trait anxiety and trait resilience on self-esteem
Author(s) Benetti, Celeste
Kambouropoulos, Nicolas
Journal name Personality and individual differences
Volume number 41
Issue number 2
Start page 341
End page 352
Publisher Pergamon
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2006-07
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Keyword(s) self-esteem
trait resilience
trait anxiety
positive affect
negative affect
Summary This study examined the influence of trait resilience and trait anxiety on self-esteem and investigated the mediating role of positive and negative affect in this relationship. Specifically, it was proposed that trait resilience and trait anxiety may exert indirect effects on self-esteem by promoting increased positive and negative affect, respectively. The final sample comprised of 240 participants (age, M = 21.55, SD = 4.16) who completed questionnaire measures of trait resilience (CD-RISC; Connor & Davidson, 2003), trait anxiety (STAI-T; Spielberger, Gorsuch, Lushene, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1983), affect (PANAS; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988) and self-esteem (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965). Path analyses (AMOS), controlling for measurement error revealed significant indirect effects of trait anxiety and trait resilience on self-esteem via negative and positive affect. The indirect model provided a very close fit to the data; estimation of the full model (direct paths) did not yield a significantly better fit. It was concluded that the impact of trait anxiety and trait resilience on self-esteem may be due to their effects on regulating affective experiences which in turn may be more proximal predictors of individual feelings of self-worth.
Notes Available online 29 March 2006.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2006.01.015
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006530

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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