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Learning opportunities for Australian prevocational hospital doctors: exposure, perceived quality and desired methods of learning.

Dent, Andrew W., Crotty, Brendan, Cuddihy, Helen L., Duns, Glenn C., Benjamin, Joan, Jordon, Carol A., Satchell, Jacqueline F., Farish, Stephen, Weiland, Tracey J. and Jolly, Brian C. 2006, Learning opportunities for Australian prevocational hospital doctors: exposure, perceived quality and desired methods of learning., Medical journal of Australia, vol. 184, no. 9, pp. 436-440.

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Title Learning opportunities for Australian prevocational hospital doctors: exposure, perceived quality and desired methods of learning.
Author(s) Dent, Andrew W.
Crotty, BrendanORCID iD for Crotty, Brendan orcid.org/0000-0002-0592-235X
Cuddihy, Helen L.
Duns, Glenn C.
Benjamin, Joan
Jordon, Carol A.
Satchell, Jacqueline F.
Farish, Stephen
Weiland, Tracey J.
Jolly, Brian C.
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 184
Issue number 9
Start page 436
End page 440
Publisher Australian Medical Publishing Company Pty. Ltd.
Place of publication Glebe, N.S.W.
Publication date 2006-05-01
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Summary Objective:

To survey prevocational doctors working in Australian hospitals on aspects of postgraduate learning.
Participants and setting:

470 prevocational doctors in 36 health services in Australia, August 2003 to October 2004.
Design:

Cross-sectional cohort survey with a mix of ordinal multicategory questions and free text.
Main outcome measures:

Perceived preparedness for aspects of clinical practice; perceptions of the quantity and usefulness of current teaching and learning methods and desired future exposure to learning methods.
Results:

64% (299/467) of responding doctors felt generally prepared for their job, 91% (425/469) felt prepared for dealing with patients, and 70% (325/467) for dealing with relatives. A minority felt prepared for medicolegal problems (23%, 106/468), clinical emergencies (31%, 146/469), choosing a career (40%, 188/468), or performing procedures (45%, 213/469). Adequate contact with registrars was reported by 90% (418/465) and adequate contact with consultants by 56% (257/466); 20% (94/467) reported exposure to clinical skills training and 11% (38/356) to high-fidelity simulation. Informal registrar contact was described as useful or very useful by 94% (433/463), and high-fidelity simulation by 83% (179/216). Most prevocational doctors would prefer more formal instruction from their registrars (84%, 383/456) and consultants (81%, 362/447); 84% (265/316) want increased exposure to high-fidelity simulation and 81% (283/350) to professional college tutorials.
Conclusion:

Our findings should assist planning and development of training programs for prevocational doctors in Australian hospitals.

Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Medical Journal of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30006574

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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