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Perceptions and attitudes of land managers in multi-tenure reserve networks and the implications for conservation

Fitzsimons, James and Wescott, Geoff 2007, Perceptions and attitudes of land managers in multi-tenure reserve networks and the implications for conservation, Journal of environmental management, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 38-48, doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2006.05.009.

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Title Perceptions and attitudes of land managers in multi-tenure reserve networks and the implications for conservation
Author(s) Fitzsimons, JamesORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Wescott, GeoffORCID iD for Wescott, Geoff orcid.org/0000-0002-9392-3319
Journal name Journal of environmental management
Volume number 84
Issue number 1
Start page 38
End page 48
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0301-4797
1095-8630
Keyword(s) biosphere reserves
Australia
ecosystem management
private land
national Reserve System
conservation management networks
Summary Multi-tenure reserve networks aim to connect areas managed for biodiversity conservation across public and private land and address the impacts of fragmentation on both biotic and social systems. The operation and function of Australian multi-tenure reserve networks as perceived by their land managers was investigated. Overall, the conservation of natural assets was the most frequently reported primary reason for involvement in a network. The perceived aims of the respective networks largely reflected the response identified for involvement and management. Over 88% of managers considered their involvement in multi-tenure reserve networks to be a positive or very positive experience. A lack of resources and time for management were considered major limitations of these networks. The majority (80%) of private land managers within networks were willing to be included in a national reserve system of conservation lands. As the Australian National Reserve System currently incorporates mostly public land, these findings have important and potentially positive implications for a greater role for protected private land.
Notes To obtain full text, please contact the author at jfitzsimons@tnc.org
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2006.05.009
Field of Research 050205 Environmental Management
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007043

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