Parent-proxy and child self-reported health-related quality of life: using qualitative methods to explain the discordance

Davis, Elise, Nicolas, Caroline, Waters, Elizabeth, Cook, Kay, Gibbs, Lisa, Gosch, Angela and Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike 2007, Parent-proxy and child self-reported health-related quality of life: using qualitative methods to explain the discordance, Quality of life research, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 863-871.


Title Parent-proxy and child self-reported health-related quality of life: using qualitative methods to explain the discordance
Author(s) Davis, Elise
Nicolas, Caroline
Waters, Elizabeth
Cook, Kay
Gibbs, Lisa
Gosch, Angela
Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike
Journal name Quality of life research
Volume number 16
Issue number 5
Start page 863
End page 871
Publisher Springer Science+Business Media
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publication date 2007-06
ISSN 0962-9343
1573-2649
Keyword(s) child self-reports
parent-proxy reports
health-related quality of life
Summary Background: Although parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are only moderately correlated with child reported HRQOL, it remains unknown why these scores differ. The aim of this study was to use a qualitative methodology to examine why parents and children report different levels of HRQOL.

Method: The sample consisted of 15 parent–child pairs. A think-aloud technique was used where parents and children were given a generic HRQOL instrument (KIDSCREEN) and instructed to share their thoughts with the interviewer. Qualitative analyses were conducted to assess whether parents and children base their answer on different experiences or reasoning, have different response styles, or interpret the items differently.

Results: There was discordance between parents and children, in terms of rating scale and in terms of the reasoning for their answer. Children tended to have different response styles to parents, where for example, children tended to provide extreme scores (highest or lowest score) and base their response on one single example, more than parents. Parents and children interpreted the meaning of the items very similarly.

Discussion: This study provides evidence to suggest that discordance among parent-child pairs on KIDSCREEN scores may be as a result of different reasoning and different response styles, rather than interpretation of items. These findings have important implications when parent-proxy reported HRQOL is used to guide clinical/treatment decisions.

Language eng
Field of Research 111005 Mental Health Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Springer Science+Business Media
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007086

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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