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Workforce trends in specialist and GP obstetric practice in Victoria

Loy, Cameron S., Warton, R. Bruce and Dunbar, James 2007, Workforce trends in specialist and GP obstetric practice in Victoria, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 186, no. 1, pp. 26-30.

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Title Workforce trends in specialist and GP obstetric practice in Victoria
Author(s) Loy, Cameron S.
Warton, R. Bruce
Dunbar, James
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 186
Issue number 1
Start page 26
End page 30
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2007-01-01
ISSN 0025-729x
Keyword(s) adult
age distribution
family practice -- manpower
female
health manpower -- statistics & numerical data
health manpower -- trends
humans
male
middle aged
obstetrics -- manpower
professional practice location -- trends
retirement -- trends
sex distribution
Victoria
Summary OBJECTIVE: To provide a contemporary picture of the general practitioner and specialist obstetric workforce in Victoria.

DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Postal census by questionnaire of all 317 Fellows and 961 Diplomates on the Victorian database of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in September 2003.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sex, age and geographical distributions and patterns of retirement from and recruitment to the GP and specialist obstetric workforce in Victoria.

RESULTS: 244 Fellows (77.0%) and 652 Diplomates (67.8%) participated. The average age of Diplomates was 42 years; only 20% were involved in procedural obstetrics. Of GPs practising procedural obstetrics, 56% intended to cease within 7 years. Two-thirds of specialist obstetricians continued to practise obstetrics. Among those ceasing obstetrics, almost half had done so since 2000. Among Fellows ceasing obstetric practice, there is a peak in the 50-60-years age group, but cessation of obstetric practice occurred across all age groups.

CONCLUSION: The proportion of GPs involved in procedural obstetrics has fallen markedly over the past decade, with half of those ceasing practice in the 40-50-years age group. New GPs entering the workforce with the Diploma and overseas doctors are unlikely to meet the procedural workforce shortfall. Attracting the large cohort of doctors aged 40-50 years back to obstetric practice must be a priority. Given the pattern of retirements from obstetrics, there will be insufficient numbers of specialists to maintain current levels of service. The reasons include non-participation in obstetrics by new graduates and international medical graduates, the inadequate number of new graduates, and the predominance of women among specialists aged under 40 years, whose work output tends to be affected by family commitments.
Language eng
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Australasian Medical Publishing Company Proprietary
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007102

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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