Ischaemic heart disease and Australian immigrants: the influence of birthplace and language skills on treatment and use of health services

Renzaho, Andre 2007, Ischaemic heart disease and Australian immigrants: the influence of birthplace and language skills on treatment and use of health services, Health information management journal, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 26-36.


Title Ischaemic heart disease and Australian immigrants: the influence of birthplace and language skills on treatment and use of health services
Author(s) Renzaho, Andre
Journal name Health information management journal
Volume number 36
Issue number 2
Start page 26
End page 36
Publisher Health Information Management Association of Australia
Place of publication Sydney, NSW
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1833-3583
1833-3575
Keyword(s) ethnicity
non-English speaking background
language barriers
invasive procedures
ischaemic heart disease
cross-cultural comparison; ;
length of stay
physician-patient relations
Summary Admission rates for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and the use of invasive cardiovascular procedures, separation mode and length of stay (LOS) were compared between Australians from non-English speaking background (NESB; n=8627) and English speaking background (ESB; n=13162) aged 20 years and over admitted to Victorian urban public hospitals. The study covered the period from 1993 to 1998. It was found that, compared with their ESB counterparts, the incidence of admission for acute myocardial infarction was significantly higher for NESB men and women before and after controlling for confounding factors. The age-adjusted ratios for NESB women compared with their ESB counterparts ranged from 1.23 to 1.89 for cardiac catheterisation, from 0.23 to 0.27 for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), and from 1.04 to 1.80 for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
Procedure rates were comparable in men for cardiac catheterisation and CABG but higher for PTA rates in NESB men (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.11-1.50) than their ESB counterparts. Both NESB men (β=0.04, 95%CI: 0.01-0.07) and women (β=0.03, 95%CI: 0.02-0.08) experienced significantly longer hospital stays than their ESB counterparts. These findings indicate there may be systematic differences in patients’ treatment and service utilisation in Victorian public hospitals. The extent to which physicians’ bias and
patients’ choice could explain these differences requires further investigation.
Language eng
Field of Research 070704 Veterinary Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007126

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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