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The effect of mood on opposite-sex judgments of males' commitment and females sexual intent

De Quadros Wander, Shikkiah and Stokes, Mark 2007, The effect of mood on opposite-sex judgments of males' commitment and females sexual intent, Evolutionary psychology: an international journal of evolutionary approaches to psychology and behavior, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 453-475.

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Title The effect of mood on opposite-sex judgments of males' commitment and females sexual intent
Author(s) De Quadros Wander, Shikkiah
Stokes, MarkORCID iD for Stokes, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-6488-4544
Journal name Evolutionary psychology: an international journal of evolutionary approaches to psychology and behavior
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Start page 453
End page 475
Publisher Ian Pitchford, Ed. & Pub
Place of publication Davie, Fla.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1474-7049
Keyword(s) Evolutionary psychology
Error management theory
Sexual intent
Commitment intent
Gender differences
Mood
Summary Gender differences in perceptions of sexual intent and commitment have been the subject of formal and informal inquiry for considerable time. One evolutionary theory, Error Management Theory (EMT), predicts that opposite-sex perceptions of female sexual intent and male commitment intent reflect intrinsic biases that minimize gender-specific evolutionary costs. The results supporting these hypotheses were obtained from subjects regardless of mood. We hypothesized that mood would influence ratings of sexual and commitment intent. Sixty participants (30 males, 30 females) were recruited and exposed to a positive and negative mood condition in counterbalanced groups using video stimuli. Preliminary analyses found an unexpected effect of order of mood induction, necessitating separate analyses of the Positive-Negative (PN) and Negative-Positive (NP) groups. Contrary to the original study, there were no gender effects. Positive moods led to increased ratings of both sexual and commitment intent across genders. Further, negative to positive mood-change was associated with significantly increased ratings. Both males and females attributed significantly higher sexual intent to same-sex rivals than themselves, but only males assessed themselves as having significantly higher commitment intent than same-sex rivals. The EMT model may require adaptation to acknowledge effects of variables such as mood on its predictions of gender-specific biases.
Language eng
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007156

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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