Openly accessible

Stability of television viewing and electronic game/computer use in a prospective cohort study of Australian children: relationship with body mass index

Hesketh, Kylie, Wake, Melissa, Graham, Melissa and Waters, Elizabeth 2007, Stability of television viewing and electronic game/computer use in a prospective cohort study of Australian children: relationship with body mass index, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 4, no. 60, pp. 1-24.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hesketh-stabilityoftelevision-2007.pdf Published version application/pdf 273.09KB 123

Title Stability of television viewing and electronic game/computer use in a prospective cohort study of Australian children: relationship with body mass index
Author(s) Hesketh, Kylie
Wake, Melissa
Graham, Melissa
Waters, Elizabeth
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 4
Issue number 60
Start page 1
End page 24
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) anthropometry
body height
body mass
body weight
child health
human computer interaction
lifestyle
obesity
television viewing
Summary Background
While much cross-sectional data is available, there have been few longitudinal investigations of patterns of electronic media use in children. Further, the possibility of a bi-directional relationship between electronic media use and body mass index in children has not been considered. This study aimed to describe longitudinal patterns of television viewing and electronic game/computer use, and investigate relationships with body mass index (BMI).
Methods
This prospective cohort study was conducted in elementary schools in Victoria, Australia. 1278 children aged 5–10 years at baseline and 8–13 years at follow-up had their BMI calculated, from measured height and weight, and transformed to z-scores based on US 2000 growth data. Weight status (non-overweight, overweight and obese) was based on international BMI cut-off points. Weekly television viewing and electronic game/computer use were reported by parents, these were summed to generate total weekly screen time. Children were classified as meeting electronic media use guidelines if their total screen time was ≤14 hrs/wk.
Results
Electronic media use increased over the course of the study; 40% met guidelines at baseline but only 18% three years later. Television viewing and electronic game/computer use tracked moderately and total screen time was positively associated with adiposity cross-sectionally. While weaker relationships with adiposity were observed longitudinally, baseline z-BMI and weight status were positively associated with follow-up screen time and baseline screen time was positively associated with z-BMI and weight status at follow-up. Children who did not meet guidelines at baseline had significantly higher z-BMI and were more likely to be classified as overweight/obese at follow-up.

Conclusion
Electronic media use in Australian elementary school children is high, increases with age and tracks over time. There appears to be a bi-directional association suggesting that interventions targeting reductions in either screen time or adiposity may have a positive effect on both screen time and adiposity.
Notes This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007445

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 21 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 500 Abstract Views, 123 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 29 Sep 2008, 08:52:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.