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The importance of human FcyRI in mediating protection to malaria

McIntosh, Richard S., Shi, Jianguo, Jennings, Richard M., Chappel, Jonathan C., de Koning-Ward, Tania, Smith, Tim, Green, Judith, van Egmond, Marjolein, Leusen, Jeanette H. W., Lazarou, Maria, van de Winkel, Jan, Jones, Tarran S., Crabb, Brendan S., Holder, Anthony A. and Pleass, Richard J. 2007, The importance of human FcyRI in mediating protection to malaria, PLoS pathogens, vol. 3, no. 5, pp. 647-658.

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Title The importance of human FcyRI in mediating protection to malaria
Formatted title Importance of human FcγRI in mediating protection to malaria
Author(s) McIntosh, Richard S.
Shi, Jianguo
Jennings, Richard M.
Chappel, Jonathan C.
de Koning-Ward, Tania
Smith, Tim
Green, Judith
van Egmond, Marjolein
Leusen, Jeanette H. W.
Lazarou, Maria
van de Winkel, Jan
Jones, Tarran S.
Crabb, Brendan S.
Holder, Anthony A.
Pleass, Richard J.
Journal name PLoS pathogens
Volume number 3
Issue number 5
Start page 647
End page 658
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1553-7366
1553-7374
Keyword(s) Fc receptor
immunoglobulin G1 antibody
malaria
Summary The success of passive immunization suggests that antibody-based therapies will be effective at controlling malaria. We describe the development of fully human antibodies specific for Plasmodium falciparum by antibody repertoire cloning from phage display libraries generated from immune Gambian adults. Although these novel reagents bind with strong affinity to malaria parasites, it remains unclear if in vitro assays are predictive of functional immunity in humans, due to the lack of suitable animal models permissive for P. falciparum. A potentially useful solution described herein allows the antimalarial efficacy of human antibodies to be determined using rodent malaria parasites transgenic for P. falciparum antigens in mice also transgenic for human Fc-receptors. These human IgG1s cured animals of an otherwise lethal malaria infection, and protection was crucially dependent on human FcγRI. This important finding documents the capacity of FcγRI to mediate potent antimalaria immunity and supports the development of FcγRI-directed therapy for human malaria.
Language eng
Field of Research 110803 Medical Parasitology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, Public Library of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007477

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.