Comparative accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy

Warden, Stuart, Kiss, Zoltan, Malara, Frank, Ooi, Alistair, Cook, Jill and Crossley, Kay 2007, Comparative accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy, American journal of sports medicine, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 428-436.

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Title Comparative accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy
Author(s) Warden, Stuart
Kiss, Zoltan
Malara, Frank
Ooi, Alistair
Cook, Jill
Crossley, Kay
Journal name American journal of sports medicine
Volume number 35
Issue number 3
Start page 428
End page 436
Publisher American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
Place of publication Waltham, MA.
Publication date 2007-03
ISSN 0363-5465
1552-3365
Keyword(s) anterior knee pain
jumper’s knee
MRI
tendinitis
ultrasound
Summary Background: Diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy is based primarily on clinical examination; however, it is commonplace to image the patellar tendon for diagnosis confirmation, with the imaging modalities of choice being magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). The comparative accuracy of these modalities has not been established.

Hypothesis: Magnetic resonance imaging and US have good (>80%) accuracy and show substantial agreement in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy.

Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging and US (gray scale [GS-US] and color Doppler [CD-US]) features of 30 participants with clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy and 33 activity-matched, asymptomatic participants were prospectively compared. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the likelihood of positive and negative test results were determined for each technique.

Results: The accuracy of MRI, GS-US, and CD-US was 70%, 83%, and 83%, respectively (P = .04; MRI vs GS-US). The likelihood of positive MRI, GS-US, and CD-US was 3.1, 4.8, and 11.6, respectively. The MRI and GS-US had equivalent specificity (82% vs 82%; P = 1.00); however, the sensitivity of GS-US was greater than MRI (87% vs 57%; P = .01). Sensitivity (70% vs 87%; P = .06) and specificity (94% vs 82%; P = .10) did not differ between CD-US and GS-US.

Conclusions: Ultrasonography was more accurate than MRI in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy. GS-US and CD-US may represent the best combination for confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy because GS-US had the greatest sensitivity, while a positive CD-US test result indicated a strong likelihood an individual was symptomatic.
Language eng
Field of Research 111603 Systems Physiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2003, AOSSM
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007615

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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