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A morphological model for sexing nestling peregrine falcons (Falco Peregrinus Macropus) verified through genetic analysis

Hurley, Victor G., Hogan, Fiona, White, John and Cooke, Raylene 2007, A morphological model for sexing nestling peregrine falcons (Falco Peregrinus Macropus) verified through genetic analysis, Wildlife research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 54-58, doi: 10.1071/WR06059.

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Title A morphological model for sexing nestling peregrine falcons (Falco Peregrinus Macropus) verified through genetic analysis
Author(s) Hurley, Victor G.
Hogan, Fiona
White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Cooke, RayleneORCID iD for Cooke, Raylene orcid.org/0000-0002-8843-7113
Journal name Wildlife research
Volume number 34
Issue number 1
Start page 54
End page 58
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2007-02-27
ISSN 1035-3712
1448-5494
Summary Adult peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus macropus) have monotypic plumage and display strong reversed sexual dimorphism, with females significantly larger than males. Reversed sexual dimorphism is measurable among nestlings in the latter stages of their development and can therefore be used to differentiate between sexes. In the early stages of development, however, nestlings cannot be sexed with any degree of certainty because morphological differentiation between the sexes is not well developed. During this study we developed a model for sexing younger nestlings based on genetic analysis and morphometric data collected as part of a long-term banding study of this species. A discriminant function model based on morphological characteristics was developed for determining the sex of nestlings (n = 150) in the field and was shown to be 96.0% accurate. This predictive model was further tested against an independent morphometric dataset taken from a second group of nestlings (n = 131). The model correctly allocated sex to 96.2% of this second group of nestlings. Sex can reliably be determined (98.6% accurate) for nestlings that have a wing length of at least 9 cm using this model. Application of this model, therefore, allows the banding of younger nestlings and, as such, significantly increases the period of time over which banding can occur. Another important implication of this model is that by banding nestlings earlier, they are less likely to jump from the nest, therefore reducing the risk of injury to both the brood and the bander.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/WR06059
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007618

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.