Wellbeing, job satisfaction and commitment among Australian community health workers: the relationship with working conditions

Noblet, Andrew, Cooper, Cary, McWilliams, John and Rudd, Annette 2007, Wellbeing, job satisfaction and commitment among Australian community health workers: the relationship with working conditions, Australian journal of primary health, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 40-48.

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Title Wellbeing, job satisfaction and commitment among Australian community health workers: the relationship with working conditions
Author(s) Noblet, Andrew
Cooper, Cary
McWilliams, John
Rudd, Annette
Journal name Australian journal of primary health
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Start page 40
End page 48
Publisher La Trobe University
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2007-12
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) community health
occupational stress
employee wellbeing
job commitment
Summary The Australian community health sector has undergone extensive organisational reform in recent times, and, in the push to enhance efficiencies and contain costs, there are indications that these changes may have undermined the wellbeing of community health personnel and their ability to provide high quality illness-prevention services. The aim of this study was to examine the working environments experienced by community health service employees and identify conditions that are predictive of employee stress. The study was guided by a tailored version of the demand-control-support model, whereby the generic components of the model had been augmented by more situation-specific stressors. The results of multiple regression analyses indicated that job control, and, to a lesser extent, social support, were closely associated with the outcome variables (psychological health, job satisfaction and organisational commitment). The more situation-specific stressors also accounted for significant proportions of explained variance. Overall, the results suggest that working conditions, particularly job control, social support and specific job stressors, offer valuable opportunities for protecting and enhancingthe wellbeing of community health service personnel.
Language eng
Field of Research 150305 Human Resources Management
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007623

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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