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Responding to self-harm in borderline personality disorder : from clinician frustration to therapeutic enquiry

Commons Treloar, Amanda and Lewis, Andrew 2007, Responding to self-harm in borderline personality disorder : from clinician frustration to therapeutic enquiry, Psychotherapy in Australia, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 34-40.

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Title Responding to self-harm in borderline personality disorder : from clinician frustration to therapeutic enquiry
Author(s) Commons Treloar, Amanda
Lewis, Andrew
Journal name Psychotherapy in Australia
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 34
End page 40
Publisher Psychoz Publications
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2007-11
ISSN 1323-0921
Summary Pessimistic attitudes and reactive behavioural management strategies act as a major barrier to effective service provision for patients with borderline personality disorder. This paper reviews research on countertransference reactions (negative professional attitudes) towards these patients and the professional response to the common presentation of self harm in this particular client group. The psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with borderline personality disorder is complex and both professionally and personally demanding. A clinical framework is proposed that enables clinicians to develop a more nuanced and empathic understanding of self harm within the context of personality disorder in order to facilitate enhanced therapeutic engagement with these challenging patients. A clinical case study illustrates the use of this framework and the potential for enhanced therapeutic management in conjunction with the recognition and reduction of clinician indifference and rejection, thus improving patient outcomes. (editor abstract)Pessimistic attitudes and reactive behavioural management strategies act as a major barrier to effective service provision for patients with borderline personality disorder. This paper reviews research on countertransference reactions (negative professional attitudes) towards these patients and the professional response to the common presentation of self harm in this particular client group. The psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with borderline personality disorder is complex and both professionally and personally demanding. A clinical framework is proposed that enables clinicians to develop a more nuanced and empathic understanding of self harm within the context of personality disorder in order to facilitate enhanced therapeutic engagement with these challenging patients. A clinical case study illustrates the use of this framework and the potential for enhanced therapeutic management in conjunction with the recognition and reduction of clinician indifference and rejection, thus improving patient outcomes.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, Psychoz Publications
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007645

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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