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Omega 3 fatty acids and the brain : review of studies in depression

Sinclair, Andrew, Begg, Denovan, Mathai, Michael and Weisinger, Richard 2007, Omega 3 fatty acids and the brain : review of studies in depression, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 16, no. S1, pp. S391-S397.

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Title Omega 3 fatty acids and the brain : review of studies in depression
Author(s) Sinclair, Andrew
Begg, Denovan
Mathai, Michael
Weisinger, Richard
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 16
Issue number S1
Start page S391
End page S397
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication McKinnon, Vic.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Keyword(s) docosahexaenoic acid
ethyl eicosapentaenoate
membrane function
depression,
dopamine
BDNF
turnover of arachidonic acid
Summary The brain is a lipid-rich organ containing mostly complex polar  phospholipids, sphingolipids, gangliosides and cholesterol. These lipids are involved in the structure and function of cell membranes in the brain. The glycerophospholipids in the brain contain a high proportion of  polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. The main PUFA in the brain are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, all cis 4,7,10,13,16,19-22:6) derived from the omega 3 fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid (AA, all cis 5,8,11,14-20:4) and docosatetraenoic acid (all cis 7,10,13,16-22:4), both derived from the omega 6 fatty acid, linoleic acid. Experimental studies in animals have shown that diets lacking omega 3 PUFA lead to substantial disturbances in neural function, which in most circumstances can be restored by the inclusion of omega 3 PUFA in the diet. In the past 10 years there has been an emerging interest in treating neuropsychological  disorders (depression and schizophrenia) with omega 3 PUFA. This paper discusses the clinical studies conducted in the area of depression and omega 3 PUFA and the possible mechanisms of action of these PUFA. It is clear from the literature that DHA is involved in a variety of processes in neural cells and that its role is far more complex than simply influencing cell membrane properties.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111716 Preventive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007690

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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