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Overseas Chinese as expatriate managers in China: is their recruitment a solution to cross-cultural management problems for multinationals operating in China?

Chung, Mona and Smith, Wendy 2007, Overseas Chinese as expatriate managers in China: is their recruitment a solution to cross-cultural management problems for multinationals operating in China?, International journal of diversity in organisations, communities and nations, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 279-292.

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Title Overseas Chinese as expatriate managers in China: is their recruitment a solution to cross-cultural management problems for multinationals operating in China?
Author(s) Chung, Mona
Smith, Wendy
Journal name International journal of diversity in organisations, communities and nations
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Start page 279
End page 292
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1447-9532
1447-9583
Keyword(s) cross-cultural management
overseas Chinese
China
Chinese ethnic diversity
human resource management
international business
Summary This paper examines the issue of diversity in Chinese identity and how it impacts on the operations of multinationals in China who recruit Overseas Chinese to handle cross-cultural issues. China’s rapid economic development and entry into the World Trade Organization in 2001 made her a formidable player in the global economy and direct foreign investment surged. Yet it is acknowledged that for the foreign investor in China, cross-cultural issues create difficulty at every level, from the interpersonal level relating to communication and negotiation, to the organizational level relating to decision making, human resource management practices, corporate legal institutions and liaison with government institutions. Western multinationals have considered the advantages of posting Overseas Chinese from Southeast Asian countries, Taiwan and Hong Kong to their China operations as a solution to cross-cultural management issues. But has this policy been successful? In terms of language expertise this would seem to be a good strategy, yet organizational case material contradicts this in reality. Overseas Chinese, while sharing some elements of Chinese culture with mainland Chinese, the Confucian heritage and other aspects such as language and diet, nevertheless have different world views and values and behave differently from mainland Chinese in areas critical to business management. As a survival strategy, Overseas Chinese have often developed dual identities which operate simultaneously. For political and historical reasons, many of them have had to adapt to the local culture of their country of citizenship or even hide their own ethnicity in order to survive. On the other hand, the mainland Chinese are different in that their behaviour has only had to be Chinese, but overlaid with this has been the experience of participating in a communist political environment for decades, which has left its mark on mainland Chinese culture. On the basis of their different historical experiences, in the current business environment in China, cultural confusion, difficulty and conflict may occur for the Overseas Chinese.

This paper focuses attention on the subtle cultural differences between the Overseas Chinese and mainland Chinese in an organizational context. This problem has yet to be researched in depth within international business and international management studies. It provides evidence that Overseas Chinese are not often favoured by the local Chinese. It gives insights on how to manage the local Chinese for foreign multinationals operating in China.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner. Readers must contact Common Ground publishing for permission to reproduce this article.
Language eng
Field of Research 150308 International Business
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ┬ęCommon Ground, Mona Chung, Wendy Smith
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007707

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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