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Painting equality : female artists as cultural entrepreneurial marketers

Rentschler, Ruth 2007, Painting equality : female artists as cultural entrepreneurial marketers, Equal opportunities international, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 665-677.

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Title Painting equality : female artists as cultural entrepreneurial marketers
Author(s) Rentschler, Ruth
Journal name Equal opportunities international
Volume number 26
Issue number 7
Start page 665
End page 677
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0261-0159
1758-7093
Keyword(s) Australia
entrepreneurialism
graphic arts
marketing strategy
women
Summary Purpose – There is growing interest by marketers in historical accounts that paint early female artists as entrepreneurial marketers. The purpose of this paper is to challenge the traditional view of entrepreneurship to incorporate a feminist theory of cultural entrepreneurship by considering the role of two female artists.
Design/methodology/approach – Using calls for historical research and new methods of enquiry in marketing, this paper traces early female artists and applies modern entrepreneurial theory to their marketing methods to identify their innovation, adaptability to change and planned marketing approach.
Findings – The paper suggests that entrepreneurial marketing is fused with the artists’ persona resulting in their celebrated status being widely recognised. It contributes an important fresh body of knowledge to the wider entrepreneurship debate by offering a new model of cultural entrepreneurial marketing. The three concepts of innovation, adaptability and marketing approach have not previously been applied to link women artists as entrepreneurs, however, this article argues that there is plenty of evidence to do so.
Research limitations/implications – While these artists are Australian (which could be seen to be a limitation), the art market is indeed international. In this respect, these artists join a longer international history as producers and consumers involved in entrepreneurial organisations from early days.
Originality/value – The artists’ significance falls within the context of emerging modernism, feminism and cultural identity during the 1920s and 1930s in Sydney, Australia. It is combined with and explains the actions and the success of two female artists’ unusual marketing approach. It is of value to readers interested in historical context regarding equality in the visual arts.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007711

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.