You are not logged in.

Knowledge management in a major construction firm in Tawian: a case study-examining the impacts of KM initiatives within the firm.

Kuo, Gina and Wu, Jeremy 2007, Knowledge management in a major construction firm in Tawian: a case study-examining the impacts of KM initiatives within the firm., International journal of knowledge, culture and change management, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 1-16.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Knowledge management in a major construction firm in Tawian: a case study-examining the impacts of KM initiatives within the firm.
Author(s) Kuo, Gina
Wu, Jeremy
Journal name International journal of knowledge, culture and change management
Volume number 7
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 16
Publisher Common Ground
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1447-9524
1447-9575
Keyword(s) knowledge management
project management
cross-project learning
case study
construction organisation
Summary This paper addresses knowledge management (KM) in a project management organisation through a case study. The case study organisation is a small- edium sized Taiwanese-owned construction company (staff size of approximately 50) with an annual turnover of approximately TWD50 (AUD$1.85) billion. Approximately one half of the company comprised project-related staff (e.g. construction project management, project documentation, estimation, procurement, and design), while the other comprised administrative and business-related staff (e.g. office administration and management, business development, and finance and accounting). The researcher undertook a series of surveys and one-on-one interviews whilst ‘embedded’ for several months with the organisation. As part of a larger research project, this case study was one of four case studies conducted in major construction organisations in Singapore, Taiwan, and Australia. The study revealed the recognition, importance and commitment of organisational culture to KM, and the effects the knowledge management initiatives have on the organisation’s ability to manage knowledge across its projects and deliver the projects at various ‘levels’ of the organisation (individual, project, departmental, and corporate). It concludes that a technologically and functionally sound KM infrastructure does not necessarily assure an organisation with a capability to manage knowledge. Organisations need to ensure that the KM repository is made up of quality and relevant contents (not just quantity), and that corporate culture (especially the willingness of individuals to share what they know) is a critical determining factor to the organisation’s ability to share, apply and create knowledge (i.e. low sharing capability leads to low application and creation capabilities).
Language eng
Field of Research 120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007738

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 592 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 29 Sep 2008, 08:55:33 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.