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Studio enquiry and new frontiers of research

Barrett, Estelle 2007, Studio enquiry and new frontiers of research, Studies in material thinking, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1-2.

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Title Studio enquiry and new frontiers of research
Author(s) Barrett, EstelleORCID iD for Barrett, Estelle orcid.org/0000-0001-9112-249X
Journal name Studies in material thinking
Volume number 1
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 2
Publisher Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies, Auckland University of Technology
Place of publication Auckland, N.Z.
Publication date 2007-04
ISSN 1177-6234
Keyword(s) studio enquiry
practice-based research
creative arts research
non-traditional research
Summary Given the growing complexity of human existence, there is a need for new ways of representing ideas and of illuminating the world and domains of knowledge. A growing recognition of the limits of traditional ways of representing the world has given rise to a search for alternative approaches to transform and represent the contents of consciousness or what can be known of lived experience. Researchers are recognising that scientific inquiry is just one type of research and that ‘research is not merely a species of social science’ (Eisner 1997: 261). Dissatisfaction with positivism and behaviourism as reductive modes of knowing has also come from within the science disciplines themselves. In his work entitled, The Discontinuous Universe, (1972) Werner Heisenberg states that the knowledge of science is applicable only to limited realms of experience and the scientific method is but a single method for understanding the world. Moreover, the notion of scientifically-based knowledge as statements of ultimate truth contains an inner contradiction since ‘the employment of this procedure changes and transforms its object’ (Heisenberg 1972: 189). The work of Heisenberg and others including: Lincoln and Denzin (2003), Schwandt, (2001) and Schon (1983) reveals that knowledge is relational and that different models of inquiry will yield different forms of knowledge.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 220399 Philosophy not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007784

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.