The effect of hook/bait size and angling technique on the hooking location and the catch of recreationally caught black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri

Grixti, Daniel, Conron, Simon and Jones, Paul 2007, The effect of hook/bait size and angling technique on the hooking location and the catch of recreationally caught black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri, Fisheries research, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 338-344.

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Title The effect of hook/bait size and angling technique on the hooking location and the catch of recreationally caught black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri
Formatted title Effect of hook/bait size and angling technique on the hooking location and the catch of recreationally caught black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri
Author(s) Grixti, Daniel
Conron, Simon
Jones, Paul
Journal name Fisheries research
Volume number 84
Issue number 3
Start page 338
End page 344
Publisher Elsevier Scientific Pub. Co.
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publication date 2007-05
ISSN 0165-7836
1872-6763
Keyword(s) hooking location
selectivity
Acanthopagrus butcheri
post-release survival
angling
hook
Summary The black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri recreational fishery is the largest estuarine fishery in Victoria. This fishery is managed through legal-minimum length and daily bag limits. The success of this management strategy requires a high survival rate for released fish. Deep-hooking is known to reduce the chance of fish survival after recreational capture and release. This study investigated the potential to reduce deep-hooking and the number of under-size A. butcheri caught by varying angling gear and techniques. Three sizes of long shank hook (small [size 8], medium [size 4] and large [size 1/0]) and two angling techniques (slack line and tight line) were tested for their deep-hooking rates and selectivity characteristics. Increasing the hook size from small to large decreased the likelihood of deep-hooking by 6.6 times (95% CI 2.3–16.3 times). Fishing with a tight line instead of a slack line decreased the chance of deep-hooking by almost 100% (95% CI 0.8–3.6). Fishing with a large hook instead of a small hook significantly (F = 6.71, df = 2, P = <0.001) increased the mean A. butcheri length, although this mean size increase was less than 1 cm. This study was able to identify angling gear and angling technique manipulations that reduced the rate of deep-hooking when targeting A. butcheri in Victorian estuaries.
Language eng
Field of Research 070499 Fisheries Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier B.V
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007824

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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