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Peace processes in Aceh and Sri Lanka: a comparative assessment

Kingsbury, Damien 2007, Peace processes in Aceh and Sri Lanka: a comparative assessment, Security challenges, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 93-112.

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Title Peace processes in Aceh and Sri Lanka: a comparative assessment
Author(s) Kingsbury, DamienORCID iD for Kingsbury, Damien orcid.org/0000-0001-9987-4688
Journal name Security challenges
Volume number 3
Issue number 2
Start page 93
End page 112
Publisher Kokoda Foundation
Place of publication Braddon, ACT
Publication date 2007-06
ISSN 1833-1459
Summary The 2004 tsunami provided a catalyst for peace talks over the separatist conflict in Aceh, Indonesia, leading to its eventual resolution in 2005. As Aceh was going to peaceful elections in 2006, Sri Lanka, which had also been affected by the tsunami, appeared to be returning to full-scale separatist war. This article assesses some of the underlying similarities and differences between the conflicts in Aceh and Sri Lanka. Within this, it will touch upon claims to self-determination, human rights and political participation, representation, transparency and accountability, more commonly referred to as 'democracy'. In particular, it will acknowledge these values as both challenges to the (restrictive) state, and the means of securing (nonrestrictive) state cohesion. Originating in the local and specific, these claims necessarily transcend the local and come to reflect elements of the normative global. In more concrete terms, the Aceh conflict was largely resolved by introducing greater local autonomy within a more democratic space. This paper similarly proposes that a resolution to the Sri Lanka conflict can only come about through the introduction of greater autonomy and democratic plurality. However, with conceptual and strategic hostility growing between Sri Lanka's conflicting parties, it appeared that such resolution was likely only after further protracted bloodshed.
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Language eng
Field of Research 160609 Political Theory and Political Philosophy
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Kokoda Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007888

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of International and Political Studies
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.