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Understanding public involvement with Australian heritage : a qualitative study using repertory grid analysis

McDonald, Heath 2007, Understanding public involvement with Australian heritage : a qualitative study using repertory grid analysis, in AM 2007 : Marketing theory into practice : 2007 Academy of Marketing Conference, Kingston Business School, Surrey, England, pp. 1-14.

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Title Understanding public involvement with Australian heritage : a qualitative study using repertory grid analysis
Author(s) McDonald, Heath
Conference name Academy of Marketing Conference (2007 : Surrey, England)
Conference location Surrey, England
Conference dates 3-6 July 2007
Title of proceedings AM 2007 : Marketing theory into practice : 2007 Academy of Marketing Conference
Editor(s) Dall'Olmo Riley, Francesca
Lomax, Wendy
Robinson, Helen
Publication date 2007
Conference series Academy of Marketing Conference
Start page 1
End page 14
Publisher Kingston Business School
Place of publication Surrey, England
Summary Attempts to increase public participation in heritage related activities have had mixed success. Tourism to heritage sites remains an overt activity that many engage in, but other heritage related activities, such as nominating objects for formal heritage listing, are much rarer. Through a series of qualitative research activities, we examine the public perceptions of what constitutes "heritage" and "heritage - related" behaviours, in order to examine barriers to greater involvement. The findings are that heritage is important to many people, particularly on a personal level. Although initially uncertain about the validity of their views, our respondents defined heritage broadly, believing it to encompass a wide range of objects, places and experiences. Most respondents were undertaking the type of heritage-related behaviours that heritage managers would encourage, however the respondents did not recognise them as being heritage-related. Barriers to greater involvement include this uncertainty over the definition of heritage and a lack of confidence in their ability to effectively recognise and protect heritage. In addition to feeling uncertain about the heritage significance of their own actions and beliefs, the respondents felt even more uncertain about prescribing things of "national heritage value". This uncertainty stifles discussion and action. The solution appears to lay in celebrations of both individual and national heritage, to foster discussions and understanding of communalities across different cultural groups within the nation.
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ISBN 1872058094
9781872058146
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2007, Kingston Business School
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007967

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.