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A social identity approach to party drug use and associated harm minimisation

Hynes, Adam and Zinkiewicz, Lucy 2007, A social identity approach to party drug use and associated harm minimisation, in Proceedings of 42nd annual conference : psychology making an impact, Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 216-221.

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Title A social identity approach to party drug use and associated harm minimisation
Author(s) Hynes, Adam
Zinkiewicz, LucyORCID iD for Zinkiewicz, Lucy orcid.org/0000-0002-1861-1673
Conference name Australian Psychological Society. Conference (42nd : 2007 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 25-29 September 2007
Title of proceedings Proceedings of 42nd annual conference : psychology making an impact
Editor(s) Moore, Kathleen
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Psychological Society Conference
Start page 216
End page 221
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary This project investigated party (club) drug use and associated harm minimisation strategies of party drug users (N = 72), by gender and sexual
orientation, to determine whether drug use and harm minimisation behaviours differ in particular social groups.Adopting a social identity approach, this project also explored the existence of a party drug user social identity in relation to harmful party drug behaviours and harm minimisation
strategies.Results indicated that males and females showed similar patterns of harmful party drug use and harm minimisation, whilst heterosexuals and homosexuals differed slightly in their patterns of harmful party drug use, and more substantially in their patterns of harm minimisation.Furthermore, results showed some evidence for the existence of a party drug user social identity, which was related to party drug use within a clear social context, and to experiencing fewer party drug related problems.The authors conclude that harm minimisation initiatives need to be designed for particular social groups, such as heterosexuals or homosexuals, targeting their particular patterns of party drug use, and
suggest that effective harm minimisation strategies should incorporate both the social context in which the behaviour occurs, and the social norms of party drug use by particular social groups.
ISBN 9780909881337
0909881332
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007970

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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Created: Mon, 29 Sep 2008, 09:02:59 EST

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