The relationship between native vegetation and in-stream salinity: An Australian case study

Versace, Vincent, Ierodiaconou, Daniel, Stagnitti, Frank, Hamilton, Andrew, Walter, M Todd and Leblanc, Marc 2006, The relationship between native vegetation and in-stream salinity: An Australian case study, in Reducing the vulnerability of societies to water related risks at the basin scale, IAHS Publications, Wallingford, England, pp. 72-76.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The relationship between native vegetation and in-stream salinity: An Australian case study
Author(s) Versace, Vincent
Ierodiaconou, Daniel
Stagnitti, Frank
Hamilton, Andrew
Walter, M Todd
Leblanc, Marc
Conference name International Symposium on Integrated Water Resources Management (3rd : 2006 : Bochum, Germany)
Conference location Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Conference dates 26-28 September 2006
Title of proceedings Reducing the vulnerability of societies to water related risks at the basin scale
Editor(s) Schumann, Andreas
Pahlow, Markus
Publication date 2006
Conference series International Symposium on Integrated Water Resources Management
Start page 72
End page 76
Publisher IAHS Publications
Place of publication Wallingford, England
Keyword(s) Australasia
Australia
degradation
land cover
geographic information systems
land use map
statistics
land use
gauging
water quality
rivers
estuaries
electrical conductivity
agriculture
drainage basins
salinity
streams
vegetation
Summary The Glenelg-Hopkins area is a large regional watershed (2.6 million ha) in southwest Victoria that has been extensively cleared for agriculture. In-stream electrical conductivity (EC) in relation to remnant native vegetation is examined from the headwaters to the upper extent of the estuary of the Glenelg River. Five water quality gauging stations were selected. Their contributing subcatchments represent a continuum of disturbance. Proportions of native vegetation ranged from ∼100% at the headwaters of the river to ∼30% at the furthest downstream gauge station. The relationship between remnant vegetation and in-stream EC was examined using aggregated and non-aggregated land use statistics over a period of 22 years from three land use maps. Increased proportions of native vegetation were significantly negatively correlated with in-stream EC and were consistent across all scenarios investigated.
ISBN 9781901502299
Language eng
Field of Research 050209 Natural Resource Management
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2007
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007973

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 608 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 29 Sep 2008, 09:03:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.