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The role of marketing employees in marketing performance : an empirical investigation

Shore, Lori A. and Shaw, Robin 2007, The role of marketing employees in marketing performance : an empirical investigation, in AM 2007 : Marketing theory into practice : 2007 Academy of Marketing Conference, Kingston Business School, Surrey, England, pp. 1-12.

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Title The role of marketing employees in marketing performance : an empirical investigation
Author(s) Shore, Lori A.
Shaw, Robin
Conference name Academy of Marketing Conference (2007 : Surrey, England)
Conference location Surrey, England
Conference dates 3-6 July 2007
Title of proceedings AM 2007 : Marketing theory into practice : 2007 Academy of Marketing Conference
Editor(s) Dall'Olmo Riley, Francesca
Lomax, Wendy
Robinson, Helen
Publication date 2007
Conference series Academy of Marketing Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Publisher Kingston Business School
Place of publication Surrey, England
Summary The role of marketing employees in contributing to marketing performance (individual and organisational), has, in general, been under-researched. Most research in marketing has focused on the activities of marketing employees and the outputs of those activities, rather than the inputs, i.e., the abilities, skills, or knowledge of the marketing employees themselves. This study represents a unique insight into the marketing capabilities and marketing performance of employees within a multinational organisation, as reported by the employees themselves. Using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM), strong support was found for a systems model of marketing competency marketing performance, suggesting that such relationships are complex and are not studied readily in isolation from external factors. Organisations that are able to conceptualise, operationalise, measure, monitor, and address marketing employee competency, intentions, and perceptions, as well as maintain the appropriate levels of management control, should have a greater likelihood of creating high performing employees, than those organisations that are unable to focus on these core aspects of people's performance. In addition, those same employees are likely to be more satisfied, motivated, and committed, require less assistance and time to complete tasks, and have greater productivity and be less likely to leave the orga.'1isation.
ISBN 1872058094
9781872058146
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2007, Kingston Business School
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007975

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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