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Are knowledge management infrastructructures capable of managing knowledge?: Case study of a major construction firm in Taiwan

Wu, Jeremy, Kuo, Chin Chin and Leifer, David 2007, Are knowledge management infrastructructures capable of managing knowledge?: Case study of a major construction firm in Taiwan, in Proceedings of 2007 Conference of the Australasian Universities Building Education Association, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 334-349.

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Title Are knowledge management infrastructructures capable of managing knowledge?: Case study of a major construction firm in Taiwan
Author(s) Wu, Jeremy
Kuo, Chin Chin
Leifer, David
Conference name Australasian Universities Building Education Association. Conference (2007: Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 4-5 July 2007
Title of proceedings Proceedings of 2007 Conference of the Australasian Universities Building Education Association
Editor(s) Kenley, Russell
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australasian Universities Building Education Association Conference
Start page 334
End page 349
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) knowledge management
project management
construction organisation
case study
Summary This paper addresses knowledge management (KM) in a project management organisation through a case study.

The case study organisation is a small-medium sized Taiwanese-owned construction company (staff size of approximately 50) with an annual turnover of approximately TWD50 (AUD$1.85) billion. Approximately one half of the company comprised project-related staff (e.g. construction project management, project documentation, estimation, procurement, and design), while the other comprised administrative and business-related staff (e.g. office administration and management, business development, and finance and accounting).

The researcher undertook a series of surveys and one-on-one interviews whilst ‘embedded’ for several months with the organisation. This study is part of an on-going international comparison involving major construction organisations in Singapore, Australia, and Taiwan.

This study examines the recognition, importance and commitment of organisational culture to KM, and the effects the knowledge management initiatives have on the organisation’s ability to manage knowledge across its projects and deliver the projects at various ‘levels’ of the organisation (individual, project, departmental, and corporate).

It concludes that a technologically and functionally sound KM infrastructure did not necessarily assure that an organisation had a capability to manage knowledge. Organisations need to ensure that their KM repository is made up of relevant and quality contents (not just quantity), and that corporate culture (especially the willingness of individuals to share what they know) is a critical determining factor to the organisation’s ability to share, apply and create knowledge (i.e. low sharing capability leads to low application and creation capabilities).
ISBN 9780980332810
0980332818
Language eng
Field of Research 120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007986

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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