Whose history? Whose heritage? Positing a sustainable future for Point Nepean, Victoria

de Jong, Ursula M. 2007, Whose history? Whose heritage? Positing a sustainable future for Point Nepean, Victoria, in Panorama to Paradise : Scopic Regimes in Architectural and Urban History and Theory : Proceedings of the XXIVth Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, 2007, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Adelaide, S. Aust., pp. 1-15.

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Title Whose history? Whose heritage? Positing a sustainable future for Point Nepean, Victoria
Author(s) de Jong, Ursula M.
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference (24th : 2007 : Adelaide, S. Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Conference dates 21 - 24 Sep. 2007
Title of proceedings Panorama to Paradise : Scopic Regimes in Architectural and Urban History and Theory : Proceedings of the XXIVth Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, 2007
Editor(s) Loo, Stephen
Bartsch, Katharine
Publication date 2007
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15 p.
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Adelaide, S. Aust.
Summary Australia's national heritage comprises exceptional natural and cultural places which help give Australia its national identity. This paper reports on work in progress. It critically and reflectively explores the bonds and  limitations between the work of historians, heritage professionals and ‘free thinkers’ – architects, artists and writers – in the task of identifying, protecting and interpreting the possibilities and opportunities presented by our cultural heritage at Point Nepean, Victoria. Underway is the development of an extensive knowledge database, as historians grapple with the problem of understanding the complex history of Point Nepean. Historians and heritage professionals aspire to recreate the past; they search for the patterns of history; they use historical evidence to gain political objectives; they distil insights from the historical record itself. While scholarship and rigorous procedures are generally adhered to, much hangs on interpretation and perspective; how documentation and imagination are interwoven; on how and by whom the story is told. Once a place is listed on National and/or State registers, the conservation process is invoked for transferring information about the past into the future, using current skills, knowledge and  techniques. In Australia conservation is underpinned by the principle that change to a heritage place should not occur at the expense of its special character and qualities, by what is described as its heritage significance. This requires that approval be obtained before any action takes place which has, will have, or is likely to have, a significant impact on the national heritage values of a listed place. Conflict in heritage management arises because there are many different views on how different values are  managed. It is the role of the architectural historian, conservation architect and architect to creatively reveal the inherent values, to interpret them and sustain the place into the future, never losing sight of Point Nepean’s unique ‘sense of place’.
ISBN 1920927557
9781920927554
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008008

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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