Investigating the shared visual context in distributed collaborative work

Jia, Dawei, Blashki, Katherine, Goward, Penelope and Eales, Jim 2007, Investigating the shared visual context in distributed collaborative work, in ICIS 2007 : Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computer and Information Science 2007, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, Calif., pp. 912-917.

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Title Investigating the shared visual context in distributed collaborative work
Author(s) Jia, Dawei
Blashki, Katherine
Goward, Penelope
Eales, Jim
Conference name International Conference on Computer and Information Science (6th : 2007 : Melbourne, Australia)
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 11-13 July 2007
Title of proceedings ICIS 2007 : Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computer and Information Science 2007
Editor(s) Lee, Rodger
Chowdhury, Morshed U.
Ray, Sid
Lee, Thuy
Publication date 2007
Conference series International Conference on Computer and Information Science
Start page 912
End page 917
Publisher IEEE Computer Society
Place of publication Los Alamitos, Calif.
Keyword(s) groupware
teleconferencing
Summary Distributed collaborators require computermediated communication (CMC) technologies in order to work together. Various systems have been developed for this express purpose with varying degrees of success. A basic method of evaluating the usability of a system is to compare it with face-to-face interaction. To replicate the face-to-face context, it is necessary to investigate how visual information plays a role in supporting collaborators performing tasks.
This research examines the effects of visual information and its role in both face-to-face and video generated visual contexts. The results were generated by asking participants to collaboratively solve visual tasks in either of the two contexts. The results show that both the face-to-face and the video conferencing contexts have similar effects on subjects’ ability to perform tasks. Task outcomes exhibited no significant difference between these two contexts. Awareness and conversational grounding had positive effects on the subject’s task performance and communication. On the other hand, presence had mixed effects on a subject’s task performance and communication behaviors.
ISBN 0769528414
9780769528410
Language eng
Field of Research 080602 Computer-Human Interaction
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, IEEE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008046

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Engineering and Information Technology
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