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A model of superiors and subordinates' aggressive communication in the workplace

Ramirez-Melgoza, A., Ashkanasy, N., Ciarrochi, J. and Wolfram Cox, Julie 2007, A model of superiors and subordinates' aggressive communication in the workplace, in ANZAM 2007 : Managing our intellectual and social capital, Promaco Conventions, Canning Bridge, W.A., pp. 1-19.

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Title A model of superiors and subordinates' aggressive communication in the workplace
Author(s) Ramirez-Melgoza, A.
Ashkanasy, N.
Ciarrochi, J.
Wolfram Cox, Julie
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (21st : 2007 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 4-7 December 2007
Title of proceedings ANZAM 2007 : Managing our intellectual and social capital
Editor(s) Chapman, Ross
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Promaco Conventions
Place of publication Canning Bridge, W.A.
Keyword(s) emotions
communication
conflict management
Summary In the workplace, superiors and subordinates may engage in a spiral of aggressive communication and emotional reaction that can lead to negative attitudes and unproductive organisational outcomes and higher staff turnover. In the manuscript, we develop and propose a model of superiors' and subordinates' aggressive communication and emotional reactions. In our model we suggest that organisational context (culture) and individual personal characteristics (personality, trust, self-esteem) influence superiors' and subordinates' aggressive communication. We also suggest that individual emotional characteristics (positive/negative affect, emotional intelligence) influence the protagonists' emotional reactions. Finally, we propose that subordinates' emotional reactions and organisational culture influence their attitudes (organisational identity, perception of a masculine vs. feminine organisation) and their considered behaviours (performance, turnover). We conclude with a discussion of potential limitations, and implications for theory, research, and practice.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1863081402
9781863081405
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, ANZAM
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008128

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.