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So much to do, so little time: multicultural practices and Australian school music

Southcott, Jane and Joseph, Dawn 2007, So much to do, so little time: multicultural practices and Australian school music, in Celebrating Musical Communities, Proceedings of the 40th Anniversary National Conference, Australian Society for Music Education Incorporated (ASME), Nedlands, W.A., pp. 199-202.

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Title So much to do, so little time: multicultural practices and Australian school music
Author(s) Southcott, Jane
Joseph, Dawn
Conference name Australian Society for Music Education. National Conference (16th : 2007 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, Australia
Conference dates July 6-10th 2007
Title of proceedings Celebrating Musical Communities, Proceedings of the 40th Anniversary National Conference
Editor(s) Stanberg, Andrea
McIntosh, Jonathon
Faulkner, Robert
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Society for Music Education Conference
Start page 199
End page 202
Publisher Australian Society for Music Education Incorporated (ASME)
Place of publication Nedlands, W.A.
Keyword(s) Multicultural education
Music -- Instruction and study
Summary In this paper, the authors are concerned with the challenges, dilemmas and choices that teachers face when teaching multicultural music in classrooms in Australia in an already overcrowded curriculum. This paper considers the notion of changing and shifting cultures, looking at how teachers can break out of the familiar paradigms in which they were trained. There will be a consideration of the notion of cultural ownership questioning whose music is to be taught, how is it to be taught, and by whom. A discussion of how music is embedded in the culture that creates it is undertaken in relation to the concepts of authenticity and transmission. The authors contend that the exploration of other cultures enables the making of connections within and without the classroom and beyond the school into the local, national and global arenas. It is our position that teachers should not hesitate to explore other musics and cultures. It is noted that teachers need support to do this which can only enhance both their teaching and the learning of their students even though there is so much to do in so little time.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780980379204
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
130302 Comparative and Cross-Cultural Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2007, Australian Society for Music Education Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008211

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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