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Flexible delivery in the Australian vocational education and training sector: Barrier to success identified in cases studies of four adult learners

Grace, Lauris and Smith, Peter 2001, Flexible delivery in the Australian vocational education and training sector: Barrier to success identified in cases studies of four adult learners, Distance education: an international journal, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 196-211, doi: 10.1080/0158791010220202.

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Title Flexible delivery in the Australian vocational education and training sector: Barrier to success identified in cases studies of four adult learners
Author(s) Grace, Lauris
Smith, Peter
Journal name Distance education: an international journal
Volume number 22
Issue number 2
Start page 196
End page 211
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2001
ISSN 0158-7919
1475-0198
Summary Government policy in Australia is increasingly encouraging training organisations in the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector to adopt flexible delivery approaches, but some researchers are sounding a note of caution. Evidence is emerging that Australian VET learners are not universally ready for flexible delivery, and this is reflected in high attrition rates and low pass rates. The literature on flexible delivery identifies a number of specific factors that can impact on the success of adult learners. However, there seems to be agreement that failure or dropout is not determined by a single factor, but by the interaction of a number of factors that build up over time. To understand these factors, we need to understand the learners - what their participation in education means to them, the context in which they are studying, and the numerous inter-connected factors that contribute to their failure to achieve a successful outcome. This paper discusses four case studies from a research project that followed up a small number of adult learners who enrolled in flexible delivery VET courses but did not achieve a successful outcome.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/0158791010220202
Field of Research 130108 Technical, Further and Workplace Education
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008384

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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