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Field-scale bioremediation of soil contaminated with crude oil

Li, Peijun, Sun, Tieheng, Stagnitti, Frank, Zhang, Chungui, Zhang, Hairong, Xiong, Xianzhe, Allinson, Graeme, Ma, Xuejun and Allinson, Mayumi 2002, Field-scale bioremediation of soil contaminated with crude oil, Environmental engineering science, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 277-289.

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Title Field-scale bioremediation of soil contaminated with crude oil
Author(s) Li, Peijun
Sun, Tieheng
Stagnitti, Frank
Zhang, Chungui
Zhang, Hairong
Xiong, Xianzhe
Allinson, Graeme
Ma, Xuejun
Allinson, Mayumi
Journal name Environmental engineering science
Volume number 19
Issue number 5
Start page 277
End page 289
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert Publishers
Place of publication Larchmont, N.Y.
Publication date 2002-09
ISSN 1092-8758
1557-9018
Keyword(s) oil-contaminated soil
composting
windrow pile
Liaohe oil field
bioremediation
inoculation
Summary Field-scale remediation of oil-contaminated soils from the Liaohe Oil Fields in China was examined using composting biopiles in windrow technology. Micronutrient-enriched chicken excrement and rice husk were applied as nutrition and a bulking agent. The lipase activities of indigenous micro-organisms were analyzed, and three indigenous fungi with high lipase activities was identified. An inoculum consisting of the three indigenous fungi and one introduced (exotic) fungus was applied to four different types of oil-contaminated soils. The results showed that the inoculum of indigenous fungi increased both the total colony-forming units (TCFU) and increased the rate of degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in all contaminated soils but at different rates. In sharp contrast to other studies, the introduction of exotic micro-organisms did not improve the remediation, and suggests that inoculation of oil-contaminated sites with nonindigenous species is likely to fail. On the other hand, indigenous genera of microbes were found to be very effective in increasing the rate of degradation of TPH. The degradation of TPH was mainly controlled by the compositions of aromatic hydrocarbons and asphaltene and resin. Between 38 to 57% degradation of crude oils (with densities ranging from 25,800 to 77,200 mg/kg dry weight) in contaminated soils was achieved after 53 days of operation. The degradation patterns followed typical first-order reactions. We demonstrate that the construction and operation of field-scale composting biopiles in windrows with passive aeration is a cost-effective bioremediation technology.
Language eng
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Mary Ann Liebert Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008493

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.