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Dietary patterns of Australian adults and their association with socio-economic status: results from the 1995 national nutrition survey

Mishra, Gita, Ball, Kylie, Arbuckle, J. and Crawford, David 2002, Dietary patterns of Australian adults and their association with socio-economic status: results from the 1995 national nutrition survey, European journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 56, no. 7, pp. 687-693.

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Title Dietary patterns of Australian adults and their association with socio-economic status: results from the 1995 national nutrition survey
Author(s) Mishra, Gita
Ball, Kylie
Arbuckle, J.
Crawford, David
Journal name European journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 56
Issue number 7
Start page 687
End page 693
Publisher Nature publishing group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2002-07
ISSN 0954-3007
1476-5640
Keyword(s) dietary patterns
socioeconomic status
factor analysis
population study
Summary Objective: To describe dietary patterns among men and women in the Australian population, and to explore how these varied according to socioeconomic status (SES).

Design: A cross-sectional self-report population survey, the 1995 Australian National Nutrition Survey (NNS), was used.

Setting: Private dwelling sample, covering urban and rural areas across Australia.

Subjects: Data provided by 6680 adults aged 18-64 who participated in the NNS were used in the analyses.

Methods: Factor analyses were used to analyse data from a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) completed by participants. Associations between SES and dietary pattens were assessed using ANOVA.

Results:
Separate factor analyses of the FFQ data for men and women revealed 15 factors, accounting for approximately 50% of the variance in both men's and women's dietary patterns. Several gender and SES differences in food patterns were observed. Lower SES males more frequently consumed 'tropical fruits', 'protein foods', and 'offal and canned fish', while high SES males more often ate 'breakfast cereals' and 'wholemeal bread'. Lower SES females more often ate 'traditional vegetables', 'meat dishes' and 'pasta, rice and other mixed foods', while high SES females more frequently ate 'ethnic vegetables' and 'breakfast cereal/muesli'.

Conclusions: These findings contribute to a better understanding of the dietary patterns that underscore gender-specific SES differences in nutrient intakes. Analyses of the type employed in this study will facilitate the development of interventions aimed at modifying overall eating patterns, rather than specific components of the diet.


Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008504

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.