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Effects of dietary fat and conjugated linoleic acid on plasma metabolite concentrations and metabolic responses to homeostatic signals in pigs

Ostrowska, Ewa, Cross, Reg F., Muralitharan, Morley, Bauman, Dale E. and Dunshea, Frank R. 2002, Effects of dietary fat and conjugated linoleic acid on plasma metabolite concentrations and metabolic responses to homeostatic signals in pigs, British journal of nutrition, vol. 88, no. 6, pp. 625-634, doi: 10.1079/BJN2002726.

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Title Effects of dietary fat and conjugated linoleic acid on plasma metabolite concentrations and metabolic responses to homeostatic signals in pigs
Author(s) Ostrowska, Ewa
Cross, Reg F.
Muralitharan, Morley
Bauman, Dale E.
Dunshea, Frank R.
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 88
Issue number 6
Start page 625
End page 634
Publisher CABI Publishing
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2002-12
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) conjugated linoleic acids
lipid metabolism
pigs
Summary Sixteen female cross-bred (Large White × Landrace) pigs (initial weight 65 kg) with venous catheters were randomly allocated to four treatment groups in a 2×2 factorial design. The respective factors were dietary fat (25 or 100 g/kg) and dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 0 or 10 g CLA-55/kg). Pigs were fed every 3 h (close to ad libitum digestible energy intake) for 8 d and were bled frequently. Plasma glucose and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) responses to insulin and adrenaline challenges were determined on day 8. Plasma concentrations of NEFA were significantly increased (10·5 and 5·4 % for low- and high-fat diets respectively, P=0·015) throughout the experiment, suggesting that there was a possible increase in fat mobilisation. The increase in lipolysis, an indicator of ß-adrenergic stimulated lipolysis, was also evident in the NEFA response to adrenaline. However, the increase in plasma triacylglycerol (11·0 and 7·1 % for low- and high-fat diets respectively, P=0·008) indicated that CLA could have reduced fat accretion via decreased adipose tissue triacylglycerol synthesis from preformed fatty acids, possibly through reduced lipoprotein lipase activity. Plasma glucose, the primary substrate for de novo lipid synthesis, and plasma insulin levels were unaffected by dietary CLA suggesting that de novo lipid synthesis was largely unaffected (P=0·24 and P=0·30 respectively). In addition, the dietary CLA had no effect upon the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose removal.
Language eng
DOI 10.1079/BJN2002726
Field of Research 060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008513

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.