Negative perceptions about self-control and identification with gender-role stereotypes related to binge eating, problem drinking, and to co-morbidity among adolescents

Williams, Robert J. and Ricciardelli, Lina 2003, Negative perceptions about self-control and identification with gender-role stereotypes related to binge eating, problem drinking, and to co-morbidity among adolescents, Journal of adolescent health, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 66-72.

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Title Negative perceptions about self-control and identification with gender-role stereotypes related to binge eating, problem drinking, and to co-morbidity among adolescents
Author(s) Williams, Robert J.
Ricciardelli, Lina
Journal name Journal of adolescent health
Volume number 32
Issue number 1
Start page 66
End page 72
Publisher Elsevier Inc
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2003
ISSN 1054-139x
1879-1972
Keyword(s) adolescents
Australia
self-control
problem drinking
gender-role stereotypes
gender differences
binge eating
Summary Purpose
To examine the role of both positive and negative styles of self-control, and gender-role stereotypes in binge eating and problem drinking.

Method
Participants were 428 adolescent boys and 555 girls from predominantly Anglo-Australian backgrounds who attended regional state schools in New South Wales, Australia. Students completed standardized questionnaires that assessed problem drinking, binge eating, self-control styles, and identification with gender-role stereotypes. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were conducted to examine differences among adolescents who reported problems in binge eating, drinking, and both domains.

Results
Adolescents who reported eating and drinking problems also reported a high negative and a low positive sense of self-control coupled with self-identification with the traits that typically describe negative dimensions of gender-role stereotypes. Regardless of gender, problem drinking was mainly related to traits of negative masculinity (bossy, noisy aggressive, etc.) whereas binge eating was mainly related to negative femininity (shy, needs approval from others, etc.). Participants who reported eating and drinking symptoms recorded low scores on positive control, high scores on negative control, and also high scores on the negative dimensions of masculinity and femininity.

Summary
A negative and passive style of self-control coupled with an identification with negative dimensions of gender summarizes the type of self-regulation that is implicated in both binge eating and problem drinking, and co-morbid symptoms. There is a need for interventions working toward a more balanced gender self-concept and a positive sense of self-control.
Language eng
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Society for Adolescent Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008635

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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