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Long-term effects of a reduced fat diet intervention on cardiovascular disease risk factors in individuals with glucose intolerance

Ley, Sarah J., Metcalf, Patricia A., Scragg, Robert K. R. and Swinburn, Boyd 2004, Long-term effects of a reduced fat diet intervention on cardiovascular disease risk factors in individuals with glucose intolerance, Diabetes research and clinical practice, vol. 2004, No 63, no. 63, 2, pp. 103-112, doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2003.09.001.

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Title Long-term effects of a reduced fat diet intervention on cardiovascular disease risk factors in individuals with glucose intolerance
Author(s) Ley, Sarah J.
Metcalf, Patricia A.
Scragg, Robert K. R.
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Diabetes research and clinical practice
Volume number 2004, No 63
Issue number 63
Season 2
Start page 103
End page 112
Publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Place of publication Ireland
Publication date 2004-02
ISSN 0168-8227
1872-8227
Keyword(s) Glucose intolerance
Reduced fat diet
Cardiovascular disease risk factors
Cholesterol
Blood pressure
Summary The long-term effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors of a reduced fat (RF), ad libitum diet were compared with usual diet (control, CD) in glucose intolerance individuals.

Participants were 136 adults aged ≥40 years with ‘glucose intolerance’ (2 h blood glucose 7–11.0 mmol/l) detected at a Diabetes Survey who completed at 1 year intervention study of reduced fat, ad libitum diet versus usual diet. They were re-assessed at 2, 3 and 5 years. Main outcome measures were blood pressure, serum concentrations of total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol:HDL ratio, triglycerides and body weight.

The reduced fat diet lowered total cholesterol (P<0.01), LDL cholesterol (P≤0.05), total cholesterol:HDL ratio (P≤0.05), body weight (P<0.01) and systolic blood pressure (P≤0.05) initially and diastolic blood pressure (P<0.01) long-term. No significant changes occurred in HDL cholesterol or triglycerides. In the more compliant 50% of the intervention group, systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and body weight were lower at 1, 2 and 3 years (P<0.05).

It was concluded that a reduced fat ad libitum diet has short-term benefits for cholesterol, body weight and systolic blood pressure and long-term benefits for diastolic blood pressure without significantly effecting HDL cholesterol and triglycerides despite participants regaining their lost weight.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2003.09.001
Field of Research 111716 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Elsevier Ireland
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008675

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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