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Body size, body composition, and fat distribution: a comparison of young New Zealand men of European, Pacific Island, and Asian Indian ethnicities

Rush, Elaine, Plank, Lindsay, Chandu, Vishnu, Laulu, Manaia, Simmons, David, Swinburn, Boyd and Yajnik, Chittaranjan 2004, Body size, body composition, and fat distribution: a comparison of young New Zealand men of European, Pacific Island, and Asian Indian ethnicities, New Zealand medical journal, vol. 117, no. 1207, pp. 1-9.

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Title Body size, body composition, and fat distribution: a comparison of young New Zealand men of European, Pacific Island, and Asian Indian ethnicities
Author(s) Rush, Elaine
Plank, Lindsay
Chandu, Vishnu
Laulu, Manaia
Simmons, David
Swinburn, Boyd
Yajnik, Chittaranjan
Journal name New Zealand medical journal
Volume number 117
Issue number 1207
Start page 1
End page 9
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Place of publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publication date 2004-12-17
ISSN 0028-8446
1175-8716
Summary Aims To investigate body size and body fat relationships and fat distribution in young healthy men drawn from New Zealand European, Pacific Island, and Asian Indian populations.
Method A total of 114 healthy men (64 European, 31 Pacific Island, 19 Asian Indian) aged 17–30 years underwent measurements of height, weight, and body composition by total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Body mass index (BMI) was then calculated. Percent body fat (%BF), fat-free mass, bone mineral content, bone mineral density, abdominal fat, thigh fat, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM) were obtained from the DXA scans.
Results For the same BMI, %BF for Pacific Island men was 4% points lower and for Asian Indian men was 7–8% points higher compared to Europeans. Compared to European men for the same %BF, BMI was 2–3 units higher for Pacific Island, and 3–6 units lower for Asian Indian. The ratio of abdominal fat to thigh fat, adjusted for height, weight, and %BF, was significantly higher for Asian Indian men than European (p=0.022) and Pacific Island (p=0.002) men. ASMM, adjusted for height and weight, was highest in Pacific Island and lowest in Asian Indian men.
Conclusions The relationship between %BF and BMI is different for European, Pacific Island, and Asian Indian men which may, at least in part, be due to differences in muscularity. Asian Indians have more abdominal fat deposition than their European and Pacific Island counterparts. Use of universal BMI cut-off points are not appropriate for comparison of obesity prevalence between these ethnic groups.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, NZMA
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008676

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.