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Thirty years into teaching: professional development, exhaustion and rejuvenation

Comber, Barbara, Kamler, Barbara, Hood, Di, Moreau, Sue and Painter, Judy 2004, Thirty years into teaching: professional development, exhaustion and rejuvenation, English teaching: practice and critique, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 74-87.

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Title Thirty years into teaching: professional development, exhaustion and rejuvenation
Author(s) Comber, Barbara
Kamler, Barbara
Hood, Di
Moreau, Sue
Painter, Judy
Journal name English teaching: practice and critique
Volume number 3
Issue number 2
Start page 74
End page 87
Publisher University of Waikato
Place of publication Hamilton, New Zealand
Publication date 2004-09
ISSN 1175-8708
Keyword(s) professional development
teacher research
late career
teacher knowledge
literacy education
teachers’ work
devolution
managerialism
Summary Female primary school teachers are usually absent from debates about literacy theory and practice, teachers’ professional development, significant policy changes and school reform. Typically they are positioned as the silent workers who passively translate the latest and of course best theory into practice, whatever that might be and despite what years of experience might tell them. Their accumulated knowledges and critical analysis, developed across careers, remain an untapped resource for the profession. In this paper five literacy educators, three primary school teachers and two university educators, all of whom have been teaching around thirty years, reflect on what constitutes professional development. The teachers examine their experiences of professional development in their particular school contexts – the problems with top-down, mandated professional development which has a managerial rather than educative function, the frustrations of trying to implement the experts’ ideas without the resources, and the effects of devolved school management on teachers’ work and learning. In contrast, they also explore their positive experiences of professional learning through being positioned as teacher researchers in a network of early and later career teachers engaged in a three-year research project investigating unequal literacy outcomes.
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Language eng
Field of Research 130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, University of Waikato
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008763

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.