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Species-specific characteristics and individual variation of the bark call produced by male Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus)

Tripovich, Joy, Rogers, Tracey and Arnould, John 2005, Species-specific characteristics and individual variation of the bark call produced by male Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus), Bioacoustics: the international journal of animal sound and its recording, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 79-96.

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Title Species-specific characteristics and individual variation of the bark call produced by male Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus)
Formatted title Species-specific characteristics and individual variation of the bark call produced by male Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus)
Author(s) Tripovich, Joy
Rogers, Tracey
Arnould, John
Journal name Bioacoustics: the international journal of animal sound and its recording
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Start page 79
End page 96
Publisher A B Academic Publishers
Place of publication Berkhamsted, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0952-4622
Keyword(s) Australian fur seals
males
vocalisations
individual variation
barks
Summary Australian fur seals Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus are colonial breeding animals forming dense social groups during the breeding season. During this time, males establish and defend territories through physical conflicts, stereotyped posturing and vocalisations. While vocalisations are suggested to play an important role in male recognition systems, it has received little attention. Recordings of nine adult male Australian fur seals were made during the 2000 and 2001 breeding seasons at Kanowna Island (39° 10’S, 146° 18' E), Bass Strait, Australia. The in-air bark vocalisations of territory-holding males were used to characterise the Bark Call and to determine whether males produce individually distinct calls, which could be used as a basis for vocal recognition. Seventeen frequency and temporal variables were measured from a total of 162 barks from nine individual males. The Bark Series was more reliably classified (83%) to the correct caller compared to the Bark Unit. This was assigned with less certainty (68%), although the classification was still relatively high. Findings from this study indicate that there is sufficient stereotypy within individual calls, and sufficient variation between them, to enable vocal recognition in male Australian fur seals.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, A B Academic Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008864

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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