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Trace metal concentrations in edible tissue of snapper, flathead, lobster, and abalone from coastal waters of Victoria, Australia

Fabris, Gastone, Turoczy, Nicholas J. and Stagnitti, Frank 2006, Trace metal concentrations in edible tissue of snapper, flathead, lobster, and abalone from coastal waters of Victoria, Australia, Ecotoxicology and environmental safety, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 286-292, doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2004.11.006.

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Title Trace metal concentrations in edible tissue of snapper, flathead, lobster, and abalone from coastal waters of Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Fabris, Gastone
Turoczy, Nicholas J.
Stagnitti, Frank
Journal name Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
Volume number 63
Issue number 2
Start page 286
End page 292
Publisher Academic Press
Place of publication San Diego, CA
Publication date 2006-02
ISSN 0147-6513
1090-2414
Keyword(s) heavy metals
fisheries
arsenic
cadmium
mercury
selenium
abalone
lobster
Summary The concentrations of heavy metals in the edible tissue of commonly fished species of the Victorian coast of Australia are reported. The metals studied were As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se, and Zn and the fish species examined were snapper (Pagruss auratus), flathead (Platycephalus bassenssis and Neoplatycephalus richardsoni), lobster (Jasus edwardsii), and abalone (Haliotis rubra). None of the fish species studied had average concentrations exceeding the maximum levels specified for As, Cd, Hg, and Pb by the Food Standards Australia and New Zealand Food Standards code. Additionally, the concentrations of Cu, Se, and Zn were close to or below the median values generally expected in these species. Essential trace elements Se and Zn were found to be well regulated by all fish species. Although also essential, Cu was not so well regulated, especially in abalone. Nonessential metals As, Cd, and Hg are not regulated in the studied fish and their concentrations in the fish tissue are dependent on size and fishing zone. Metal concentrations were not largely affected by sex. Surprisingly, the concentrations of metals in fish in Port Phillip Bay, a zone, which includes the major cities of Melbourne and Geelong and is known to have high concentrations of metals in the water and sediment, were not consistently higher than those in other less-populated fishing zones.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2004.11.006
Field of Research 070402 Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Elsevier Inc
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30008974

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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