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Family and home correlates of television viewing in 12-13 year old adolescents: the Nepean study

Hardy, Louise L., Baur, Louise A., Garnett, Sarah P., Crawford, David, Campbell, Karen, Shrewsbury, Vanessa A., Cowell, Christopher T. and Salmon, Jo 2006, Family and home correlates of television viewing in 12-13 year old adolescents: the Nepean study, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 3, no. 24, pp. 1-9.

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Title Family and home correlates of television viewing in 12-13 year old adolescents: the Nepean study
Author(s) Hardy, Louise L.
Baur, Louise A.
Garnett, Sarah P.
Crawford, David
Campbell, Karen
Shrewsbury, Vanessa A.
Cowell, Christopher T.
Salmon, Jo
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 3
Issue number 24
Start page 1
End page 9
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006-09-10
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary Background
Few young people meet television viewing guidelines.
Purpose
To determine the association between factors in the family and home environment and watching television, including videos and DVDs, in early adolescence.
Methods
Cross-sectional, self-report survey of 343 adolescents aged 12–13 years (173 girls), and their parents (338 mothers, 293 fathers). Main measures were factors in the family and home environment potentially associated with adolescents spending ≥ 2 hours per day in front of the television. Factors examined included family structure, opportunities to watch television/video/DVDs, perceptions of rules and regulations on television viewing, and television viewing practices.
Results
Two-thirds of adolescents watched ≥ 2 hours television per day. Factors in the family and home environment associated with adolescents watching television ≥ 2 hours per day include adolescents who have siblings (Adjusted Odds Ratio [95%CI] AOR = 3.0 [1.2, 7.8]); access to pay television (AOR = 2.0 [1.1, 3.7]); ate snacks while watching television (AOR = 3.1 [1.8, 5.4]); co-viewed television with parents (AOR = 2.3 [1.3, 4.2]); and had mothers who watched ≥ 2 hours television per day (AOR = 2.4 [1.3, 4.6]).
Conclusion

There are factors in the family and home environment that influence the volume of television viewed by 12–13 year olds. Television plays a central role in the family environment, potentially providing a means of recreation among families of young adolescents for little cost. Interventions which target family television viewing practices and those of parents, in particular, are more likely to be effective than interventions which directly target adolescent viewing times.
Notes This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Hardy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009014

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.