Outcome data from the LEAP (Live, Eat and Play) trial: a randomized controlled trial of a primary care intervention for childhood overweight/mild obesity

McCallum, Z., Wake, M., Gerner, B., Baur, L. A., Gibbons, K., Gold, Lisa, Gunn, J., Harris, C., Naughton, G., Riess, C., Sanci, L., Sheehan, J., Ukoumunne, O. C. and Waters, Elizabeth 2007, Outcome data from the LEAP (Live, Eat and Play) trial: a randomized controlled trial of a primary care intervention for childhood overweight/mild obesity, International journal of obesity, vol. 31, pp. 630-636.

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Title Outcome data from the LEAP (Live, Eat and Play) trial: a randomized controlled trial of a primary care intervention for childhood overweight/mild obesity
Author(s) McCallum, Z.
Wake, M.
Gerner, B.
Baur, L. A.
Gibbons, K.
Gold, Lisa
Gunn, J.
Harris, C.
Naughton, G.
Riess, C.
Sanci, L.
Sheehan, J.
Ukoumunne, O. C.
Waters, Elizabeth
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 31
Start page 630
End page 636
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) childhood obesity
primary care
randomized controlled diet
secondary prevention
overweight
Summary OBJECTIVES: To reduce gain in body mass index (BMI) in overweight/mildly obese children in the primary care setting.
DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial (RCT) nested within a baseline cross-sectional BMI survey.
SETTING: Twenty nine general practices, Melbourne, Australia.
PARTICIPANTS: (1) BMI survey: 2112 children visiting their general practitioner (GP) April-December 2002; (2) RCT: individually randomized overweight/mildly obese (BMI z-score <3.0) children aged 5 years 0 months-9 years 11 months (82 intervention, 81 control).
INTERVENTION: Four standard GP consultations over 12 weeks, targeting change in nutrition, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, supported by purpose-designed family materials.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary: BMI at 9 and 15 months post-randomization. Secondary: Parent-reported child nutrition, physical activity and health status; child-reported health status, body satisfaction and appearance/self-worth.
RESULTS: Attrition was 10%. The adjusted mean difference (intervention-control) in BMI was -0.2 kg/m(2) (95% CI: -0.6 to 0.1; P=0.25) at 9 months and -0.0 kg/m(2) (95% CI: -0.5 to 0.5; P=1.00) at 15 months. There was a relative improvement in nutrition scores in the intervention arm at both 9 and 15 months. There was weak evidence of an increase in daily physical activity in the intervention arm. Health status and body image were similar in the trial arms.
CONCLUSIONS: This intervention did not result in a sustained BMI reduction, despite the improvement in parent-reported nutrition. Brief individualized solution-focused approaches may not be an effective approach to childhood overweight. Alternatively, this intervention may not have been intensive enough or the GP training may have been insufficient; however, increasing either would have significant cost and resource implications at a population level.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2006
Copyright notice ©2007, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009022

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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