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Teaching research and epidemiology to undergraduate students in the health sciences

James, Eric, Graham, Melissa, Snow, Pamela and Ward, Bernadette 2006, Teaching research and epidemiology to undergraduate students in the health sciences, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 575-578, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2006.tb00790.x.

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Title Teaching research and epidemiology to undergraduate students in the health sciences
Author(s) James, Eric
Graham, MelissaORCID iD for Graham, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0002-0927-0002
Snow, Pamela
Ward, Bernadette
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 30
Issue number 6
Start page 575
End page 578
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Publication date 2006-12
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Summary Objective: To identify and address particular challenges in the teaching of epidemiological concepts to undergraduate students in non-clinical health disciplines. Methods and Results: Relevant pedagogical literature was reviewed to identify a range of evidence-based teaching approaches. The authors also drew on their experience in curriculum development and teaching in this field to provide guidelines for teaching epidemiology in a way that is engaging to students and likely to promote deep, rather than surface, learning. Discussion of a range of practical strategies is included along with applied examples of teaching epidemiological content. Conclusions and Implications: Increasingly, there is a greater emphasis on improved learning outcomes in higher education. Graduates from non-clinical health courses are required to have a core understanding of epidemiology and teachers of epidemiology need to be able to access resources that are relevant and useful for these students. A theoretically grounded framework for effective teaching of epidemiological principles to non-clinical undergraduates is provided, together with a range of useful teaching resources (both paper and web-based). Implementation of the strategies discussed will help ensure graduates are able to appropriately apply epidemiological skills in their professional practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2006.tb00790.x
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Public Health Association of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009033

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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