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Individual variation in the pup attraction call produced by female Australian fur seals during early lactation

Tripovich, Joy, Rogers, Tracey, Canfield, Rhondda and Arnould, John 2006, Individual variation in the pup attraction call produced by female Australian fur seals during early lactation, Journal of the acoustical society of America, vol. 120, no. 1, pp. 502-509.

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Title Individual variation in the pup attraction call produced by female Australian fur seals during early lactation
Author(s) Tripovich, Joy
Rogers, Tracey
Canfield, Rhondda
Arnould, John
Journal name Journal of the acoustical society of America
Volume number 120
Issue number 1
Start page 502
End page 509
Publisher Acoustical Society of America
Place of publication Woodbury, N.Y.
Publication date 2006-07
ISSN 0001-4966
Keyword(s) human
vertebrata
mammalia
carnivora
pattern recognition
regression analysis
classification
discriminant analysis
discriminant function
voiced signal
attraction
newborn
pinnipedia
sound production
biocommunications
bioacoustics
Summary Otariid seals (fur seals and sea lions) are colonial breeders with large numbers of females giving birth on land during a synchronous breeding period. Once pups are born, females alternate between feeding their young ashore and foraging at sea. Upon return, both mother and pup must relocate each other and it is thought to be primarily facilitated by vocal recognition. Vocalizations of thirteen female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) were recorded during the breeding seasons of December 2000 and 2001, when pups are aged from newborns to one month. The pup attraction call was examined to determine whether females produce individually distinct calls which could be used by pups as a basis for vocal recognition. Potential for individual coding, discriminant function analysis (DFA), and classification and regression tree analysis were used to determine which call features were important in separating individuals. Using the results from all three analyses: F0, MIN F and DUR were considered important in separating individuals. In 76% of cases, the PAC was classified to the correct caller, using DFA, suggesting that there is sufficient stereotypy within individual calls, and sufficient variation between them, to enable vocal recognition by pups of this species.
Language eng
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Acoustical Society of America
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009058

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.